He doesn’t run too many meetings, if any. Most meetings at Yelp are run according to the RASCI model (Responsibility assignment matrix), which was imported from eBay and is undoubtedly used at other companies, too. The goal is to run meetings more efficiently without the meeting overload you sometimes find at other companies where people habitually go to meetings as a way to prove their relevance and consume their workdays.

The RASCI approach forces people to ask whether they belong in the room regardless of their title or tenure. If you don’t have a designated seat at the table according to the model, you don’t belong. Sorry, goodbye, it doesn’t matter whether you are the CEO, COO, or Vice President of Meeting Awesomeness …

RASCI has a dozen or so different iterations and implementations with different letters in the acronym, but at its core, there is an “R”, who is responsible for running the meeting and an “A” who is responsible for approving the next steps based on the R’s analysis and recommendations. (The other letters in the acronym are usually people who help implement the R’s plans or are critically impacted by them.)

The most important person in the meeting is usually the R. They set the agenda, tee up the issues, make recommendations, and own the execution. The A is mostly there to poke and prod, challenge assumptions, help focus the efforts, and ultimately give a thumbs up or thumbs down. All of this is to say that Jeremy is usually the A rather than the R. He doesn’t run too many meetings but he does poke and prod, challenge assumptions, help focus the efforts, and ultimately give a thumbs up or thumbs down just like he’s supposed to in the RASCI system.

This Answer was posted by  by Laurence Wilson, General Counsel at Yelp, on Quora